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Kathy Marshack News

What to do when your spouse has ADD?

Tuesday, April 13, 2010


ADD is not something that only affects children. Adult ADD is a common disorder.  Symptoms of ADD include problems with following through on instructions, paying attention, poor listening, disorganization, lack of attention to detail, trouble with tasks that require planning or long-term effort,  easily distracted, or forgetful. In addition, some with ADD can be fidgety, verbally impulsive, unable to wait their turn, and act on impulse regardless of consequences.

 

If you are married to someone with ADD, it is realistic to expect that there will be additional challenges in your marriage due to your spouse’s disorder. What are some simple things you can do to minimize problems in your marriage?

One key is to be organized. Making lists and keeping an up-to-date schedule will help the spouse with ADD to stay on track. You may have to kindly and tactfully remind them of important details just to keep the information fresh in their mind. We have so many handy organizational tools today. Things like sticky notes, cell phone alarms, and Google Calendar are all good aids to keep your life together organized. Another tip is to keep life simple – avoid filling the home with unnecessary things that will distract them.

Remember that mistakes and miscommunication are all part of life, regardless if ADD is present in your marriage. It is important to understand what your spouse is capable of and what their strengths and weaknesses are. Understanding on your part will help you to gain a greater appreciation for them and their disorder. Professional help may be necessary at times. A marriage counselor or a mental health care professional can help you and your spouse by giving you direction in dealing with one another and the disorder.

For more information, visit ADD in Adults on my website.

Adults and ADD

Friday, September 04, 2009


You don't outgrow ADD. With that being said, many adults are being diagnosed with this disorder. Many ADD adults say that they weren’t aware of the disorder until they had a child who was diagnosed. After seeing ADD in their children, these adults gradually realized that they had the same signs and symptoms. Imagine the shock of learning as an adult you have ADD. This has been the case for many. Interestingly, the reactions of learning about the diagnosis have been completely varied. ADDitude, an online magazine, wrote a great article on adults with ADD and commented about the different reactions. ADD made some adults feel like outsiders, frustrated and disorganized. For these, learning of their disorder and getting proper care was complete relief! Others felt angry that they didn't know sooner and blamed their parents for not recognizing the signs. Then there are the type that love having ADD because of their high intellect, creative energy and abilities so they decide to refuse treatment. Even though ADD does not affect everyone the same, I do recommend seeking treatment. Many have learned counterproductive survival skills that could have damaging effects on their job, marriage, and parenting style. To learn more about ADD and the type of treatment that I recommend visit my website or contact me personally for more information.

Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplements Reduce ADD Symptoms

Tuesday, June 16, 2009


For decades, medications have been used to treat the symptoms of attention deficit disorders. For many people, these medicines dramatically reduce their hyperactivity and improve their ability to focus, work, and learn. But many people are hesitant about taking medication. Is there anything else available to reduce symptoms of ADD? Dr. Daniel Amen, a child psychiatrist, has been using Omega-3 fatty acid supplements for years to treat patients with ADD. In one of his recent newsletters, Dr. Amen highlighted a study from Canadian researchers studying the effects of Omega-3’s on ADD. Their results showed that children taking Omega-3 supplements have better behavior and a greater attention span. This study has been published in the February 2009 journal, Paediatric Child Health. Omega-3 fatty acids are not only beneficial for ADD, but also for depression, joint pain, and great for the brain. In addition to medication or supplements, I highly recommend behavioral therapy, emotional counseling, and practical support. In individual counseling, a therapist can help the child or adult with ADD learn to feel better about themselves. They do this by helping them recognize that having a disability does not reflect who they are as a person. Over time the therapist can help people with ADD identify and build on their strengths, cope with daily problems, and learn to control their attention and aggression. For more information on coping with ADD/ADHD, please visit my website.


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